My Experience Receiving the COVID 19 Vaccine as a Wheelchair User with Cerebral Palsy

Back at the beginning of March, I was lucky enough to get my first dose of the COVID 19 vaccine! I ran polls on my social media and my readers said they would be interested in a post on my experience of the vaccination process as a wheelchair user with Cerebral Palsy, so that’s what this post is. Before I get into the post, I would like to say that I have complete solidarity with my fellow disabled people who have been #LeftOffTheList for priority vaccination and I hope everyone is able to receive the vaccine soon.

In terms of the structure of  this post, it will be split into the booking process, my on the day experience of actually getting the vaccine and then any aftereffects I experienced.

Booking

When it came to booking my vaccination, Cerebral Palsy is in vaccine priority group 6 here in England  (something I found out via friends online who also have CP, not actual government communications *rolls eyes at the disorganisation from our government*). After a little while of group 6 being contacted to arrange their vaccinations, I’d still heard nothing.  Then my mum (who has been shielding and was therefore one of the highest priority groups for vaccination) said I could just book online with my NHS number and postcode rather than waiting to be contacted. I tried that a few times but was initially not allowed to book a timeslot. When the system finally let me in, the first thing I was asked was if I had any specific accessibility requirements (I selected wheelchair accessible, step free access and disabled toilet). I was able to select a timeslot for my first vaccination, but initially couldn’t select a timeslot for my second injection at that same vaccination centre. This meant I had to spend time researching how I was going to get to one of the other vaccination centres. It turned out that I would have to get a short train to the next nearest centre, which meant spending EVEN MORE time researching whether I could actually use that train station. By the time I’d done all of the research, the website had timed out, so I had to go through the booking process again. However, the website timing out was kind of lucky as, at the second time of asking, I was able to book both injections at the same vaccination centre which was in walking distance of my house. I then got confirmation of my vaccination appointments via text.

On The Day

On the day of my actual vaccination, I just walked to the vaccination centre. My maps took me to the car park entrance which wasn’t very helpful. There was also very little signage directing me to the entrance, until I was right in front of the building (which was named with a giant sign on it anyway). When I did find the entrance, there were actually 2 entrances, one down a set of stairs and one on my entrance level for those with mobility issues. The centre had a one way system with those waiting to vaccinated entering via a different door than the exit door used by those who had just BEEN vaccinated. There was also a socially distanced queue outside. Once I was let into the centre, I was checked in by giving my name and Date Of Birth. I was then given some hand gel and told to follow the markers down to the main seating area. Once I was down there, I was asked to sit in the open space rather than the organised seating area so that volunteers would not have to move a chair out of the way in the seating are. Usually this would have annoyed me but, in this context, it kind of made sense in terms of infection control and minimising the amount of objects touched. Then I was  told I was next up and was checked in again (this time I sat opposite someone at a desk with a computer and they moved the chair out of the way  so I could position my wheelchair. This person initially asked for my NHS number which I did not have to hand. So instead they asked for my address, Date Of Birth and some other details in order to find me on the system. I was then directed to the station where I had the injection and where another assistant at a separate computer checked me in again. Then the nurse explained the vaccination process whilst she set up the injection, and I asked her to inject the vaccine into my “non-driving” arm (aka the arm I DON’T use to control my wheelchair). I don’t like needles so I looked away whilst the nurse did the actual injection. I did bleed slightly afterwards but it was nothing that couldn’t be stopped by a plaster. Then nurse then gave me a “what to expect” leaflet and my vaccine card (which she told me to keep for when I got the second dose). THEN she asked if I was driving and this is where it got a little awkward because do I say yes or no? My wheelchair isn’t a car but I’m kind of in charge of a vehicle (I said no, but I think, since my wheelchair is a road legal vehicle, I should have actually said yes). Because I said I wasn’t driving, I was told I could go straight home without waiting to see if I had an adverse reaction.

After Effects

In terms of aftereffects , my main ones were tiredness and shivering alongside an achy injection site and general muscle soreness (I would describe it as similar to my worst days with Cerebral Palsy Spasticity). Those effects lasted about 2 days. I would say the arm soreness was the worst since I can’t actually rest my arms because I have to use them to move my walker and generally get around. I think these aftereffects probably felt worse since I am a terrible patient who has real difficulty following suggestions like “rest” and “do nothing”.

I hope this post gives helpful insight into my experience receiving the COVID 19 vaccine as a wheelchair user with Cerebral Palsy and what you can possibly expect when you receive your vaccine.

Stay Invincible!

Em (Invincible Woman On Wheels)

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